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Author: Rochelle Gonzales

Date: February 25, 2021

UV-C: Leveraging the power of light against superbugs

What is UV-C?

You’ve likely heard of ultraviolet light before; probably in the context of sun block or a tanning bed. But UV light exists on a spectrum. At the short end of that spectrum is UV-C with a wavelength of 200 to 280 nanometers. For perspective on how small that is, a nanometer is one billionth of a metre! 

The most amazing part about UV-C light is that it has been proven to inactivate dangerous germs like bacteria and viruses.1 The light attacks these organisms at a molecular level. This prevents the germs from reproducing, rendering them harmless.

The history of UV-C

The use of UV light has been known for many years to have a germicidal effect, meaning it can destroy harmful microorganisms. In 1904, a breakthrough discovery showcased the greatest germicidal effectiveness was found to be within the UV-C region in the UV spectrum.2 Since then, further discoveries like this and along with ongoing research, continue to prove the effectiveness of UV-C wavelengths against pathogenic microorganisms.

UV-C light vs. superbugs

 

The UV spectrum is simply divided into three classifications based on wavelength’s interaction with molecules: 

1. Ultraviolet-A (UV-A),

2. Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) and

3. Ultraviolet-C (UV-C).

UV-C light is often considered the “germicidal” spectrum because of its effects against bacteria and viruses.3 Due its proven ability to effectively inactivate viruses and bacteria, the adoption of UV-C is key to limiting the spread of infectious diseases.

The technology is important because of its ability to disrupt stable bonds in organic compounds and its ability to cause a permanent change to the bases of DNA and RNA structure. This is important because DNA and RNA serve as the code for bacteria to replicate. UV-C light damages this structure and inhibits germs from further dividing and infecting other host cells.

UV-C technology works through line of sight, only environments or surfaces that are directly exposed to the light will be sanitized. 

Is UV-C safe? 

Anyone who has suffered from a sunburn can attest to the harmful impacts that too much UV light can have. However, the sun transmits UV-A and UV-B light whereas UV-C light is blocked by the ozone layer and it is not something that we are regularly exposed to.

Just like sunlight, if exposed directly to high doses, UV-C light can be harmful to human skin and eyes. Therefore, there are risks associated with the use of UV-C light and appropriate precautions must be taken when handling devices with UV-C technology. 

CleanSlate UV devices have been certified for regulatory compliance and follows safety standards regulated by the EPA and Industry Canada.*

The data that proves it all

We believe in using evidence-based data to showcase the performance of CleanSlate UV. Many tests have been conducted to test the effectiveness of CleanSlate UV. Most recently, CleanSlate UV has tested against SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19 and found a 99.995% reduction rate!

CleanSlate UV is continuously testing and creating research studies in collaboration with independent and public institutions to improve product performance. 


*Additional Information with Regulatory and Safety Compliance

CleanSlate UV is regulated by the EPA and Industry Canada. It has been certified by TUV SUD according to UL/IEC 61010-1 standards and has a CE marking. The product meets IEC 62471 standards on UV safety (exempt group) as well as FCC Part 15 Subpart B, ICES-003 and IEC 61326 standards for EMI/EMC.

1. Rajesh P. Rastogi, Richa, Ashok Kumar, Madhu B. Tyagi, Rajeshwar P. Sinha, "Molecular Mechanisms of Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair", Journal of Nucleic Acids, vol. 2010, Article ID 592980, 32 pages, 2010. https://doi.org/10.4061/2010/592980

2. Reed N. G. (2010). The history of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation for air disinfection. Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974)125(1), 15–27. https://doi.org/10.1177/003335491012500105

3. Cutler TD, Zimmerman JJ. Ultraviolet irradiation and the mechanisms underlying its inactivation of infectious agents. Anim Health Res Rev. 2011 Jun;12(1):15-23. doi: 10.1017/S1466252311000016. PMID: 21676338

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